Rumboldswhyke School and
The Parish of St. George’s Whyke

St George logo
St Georges church

Ever since its foundation Rumboldswhyke School has enjoyed very close links with the Parish of St. George’s Whyke.  

In 1883, The Rev’d Thomas Brandram, released some church land in order that a school might be built in the Rumboldswhyke area of Chichester.  The present “new” School building was officially opened and dedicated on the 14th May 1964 by the Bishop of Chichester, and a commemorative plaque in the entrance porch marks that occasion.


The Parish is rightly proud of Rumboldswhyke School and the Christian ethos which characterises all aspects of its life. While we are not about making ‘converts’ to the Christian faith, we endeavour to give the children a positive experience of what it means to be part of a Christian community, whilst being tolerant and accepting of other religious traditions which go to make up British Society today.

The Rector of St. George’s is automatically an ex offico Foundation Governor of the School.  In addition two other people from the Church congregation are appointed to the governing body as Foundation Governors.  Foundation governors have a special care for the School’s Christian character as well as contributing to the overall wellbeing and effectiveness of our School.

The church building itself is a great learning resource for the children of our school with many colourful and a rich a variety of visual aids, and we have guided tours for year groups throughout the year.   The church is also used by the school community for social events such as barn dances as well as end of term services and celebrations.  The church car park is also available to parents at the start and the end of each school day for collecting their children.

As a Church of England Controlled School, Rumboldswhyke School is a part of a larger Church community known as the Diocese of Chichester, which provides 35,000 children throughout East and West Sussex with a Christian led education.

Fr. Tim Peskett
Rector of St. George’s Church